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Chaplain Page


Marty Wood AMVETS post 312 Chaplain

 

CHAPLAIN’S CORNER-Summer 2017

We just celebrated the AMVETS birthday on 23 July. A birthday prayer:

 

O God, Judge over all Nations, be with us as we pay tribute to our 70th AMVETS birthday. We rejoice that we are a source of support to our country. Help guide us in the work of our great organization. May our activities be counted among the good deeds that please thee. We ask for strength and the ability to do the tasks you set before us. Keep us concerned about the welfare and improvement of our community, the safety and pride of our homes, and the moral and spiritual values that guide our community living. We ask they blessings upon our members and guests. All this we ask for God and Country,  Amen.

 

A discussion came up around the Fourth of July about saluting the flag when out of uniform, so I did a little research. The National Defense Authorization Act of 2008 allows all uniformed service members, military retirees, and veterans to salute the flag and in 2009 was updated to include saluting during the National Anthem. This was reaffirmed 26 December 2013. This helps promote patriotism and show people attending public events how many people around them have been willing to give their lives in defense of this great United States of America.

 

Which lead me to look into the Pledge of Allegiance. While the Pledge of Allegiance is not routinely done in many public schools across the nation, it has not been banned but is up to the discretion of the individual teacher or school whether or not it is recited. Original composed in 1887 and adopted by Congress in 1942, the words “under God” we’re not added until 1954. Allow me to share with you A Reflection on the Pledge of Allegiance I found in a publication by Brian L. Bohiman.

I pledge allegiance to the flag

When we recite the pledge, we are promising to be faithful to the ideals of our country.

Of the United States of America

The flag symbolizes our 50 states joined in a common bond to fulfill those ideals.

And to the Republic for which it stands,

One of the worthy principles that bonds Americans together is our loyalty to the way we govern ourselves - as a republic. We elect representatives who govern for a time and are accountable to us for the job they do.

One Nation under God,

Our Founders understood that the government does not give us our freedom. Our freedom ultimately comes from God, and our government was established to secure that God-given freedom. Our Declaration of Independence states, “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, and that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights, that among them are, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness- that to secure these rights, governments are instituted among men…”

Indivisible,

We pledge ourselves to stay together as a country, even when we disagree.

With liberty and justice for all.

Liberty means freedom, and we commit ourselves to such liberties as the freedom to worship, freedom to assemble, and freedom to speak. We also commit ourselves to justice which means being fair and right in our judgment of people.

 

By reciting the pledge, we remind ourselves of our commitment to these high ideals. If the schools are not teaching this anymore, let’s teach our children and grandchildren the Pledge of Allegiance, patriotism, and pride in the United States of America.